Category: Nuclear weapons

Daily Caller: Why did we give Putin control over our satellite launches?

After Russia cut off the sole supply of first-stage booster engines to the U.S. Air Force’s Atlas V rockets – the rockets that place our military and intelligence satellites in orbit – I wrote a piece for The Daily Caller to alert the public to the problem, and to ask the question: Why did we let this happen? Here’s the...

InFocus: America’s ‘provocative weakness’

The Jewish Policy Center ran my article, “America’s ‘provocative weakness,’” in the winter edition of its quarterly journal, InFocus. The piece relates to how US strategy toward dealing with Russia (presuming that there is a strategy), and important foreign policy positions concerning Iran, Syria, the Muslim Brotherhood and Europe, are playing into the Kremlin’s hands and giving Vladimir Putin an...

Subsidizing Russia’s nuclear scientists

by J Michael Waller, Insight, April 5-12, 1999 Nearly six years ago, Congress and the Clinton administration launched a visionary scheme to help the scientists and engineers designing the Soviet weapons of mass destruction to put their skills to civilian use. The goal was to prevent them from working for rogue regimes such as Iran, Iraq or North Korea. As...

From butter to missiles

By J Michael Waller, Washington Times, December 15, 1998 Russia’s new government leaders have yet to devise a coherent recovery plan as they beg for Western economic and food aid. But instead, they have been spending their time and money preparing for — of all things — nuclear war against the United States and its allies. Meanwhile the Clinton administration...

No nukes pointed this way? Think again

by J Michael Waller, Washington Times, July 6, 1998 After years of assuring the public that no nuclear missiles are aimed at the United States, President Clinton came to China with a proposal to Beijing — a proposal admitting that what he told the American people was untrue. The president asked China’s communist leaders to de-target their nuclear missiles directed...

IMF and the Russian missiles

by J Michael Waller, Washington Times, January 23, 1998 American national security depends on Congress providing more money for the International Monetary Fund. That’s what Defense Secretary William Cohen is telling fellow Republicans on Capitol Hill, in a last-ditch administration effort to bail out troubled economies in Asia and elsewhere. For those unmoved by economic arguments, national security concerns are...

Testimony on Russian nuclear missile de-targeting

by J Michael Waller Testimony on Russian nuclear missile de-targeting, before the National Security Research & Development Subcommittee, US House of Representatives, March 13, 1997 Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to have been asked to appear before this subcommittee to address the administration’s claims that no nuclear missiles are targeted against the United States.  My focus is not on the...

Waller’s rebuttal to Ashton Carter’s ‘misleading’ response

“Author’s Rebuttal to the Department of Defense” Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization By J Michael Waller Part of “Delay, Postpone, Obfuscate, Derail” Publication Date: Winter 1997 Posted: Wednesday, January 8, 1997 Assistant Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter’s 9 September letter responding to my article, “To Russia, With Cash” (Reader’s Digest, June 1996) states, “Much of what was said in the...

‘Delay, Postpone, Obfuscate, Derail’ – A case study of US aid to the former USSR

‘Delay, Postpone, Obfuscate, Derail’ – A case study of US aid to former USSR Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization (American University and Moscow State University) By J. Michael Waller With rebuttals from the US Department of State and Department of Defense Publication Date: Winter 1997 PDF originals: (1) Demok 97a Waller Delay; (2) Demok 97b State Dept; (3) Demok 97c Waller State; (4) Demok 97d DoD;...

Author’s rebuttal to the Department of State

by J Michael Waller, Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization (American University and Moscow State University), Winter 1997 Mr. Morningstar should be recognized for listening to complaints, criticisms, and suggestions on improving aid to the former Soviet Union. He is doubtless the single most influential figure in the United States government to attempt to reform the process. He solved many...