Category: Russia

Syrian protesters burn Iranian, Russian and Chinese flags

Here’s something you don’t see every day: Protesters burning the flags of the Islamic Republic of Iran, the Soviet Union Russia, and Communist China. Syrian protesters know who’s propping up their murderous regime, as we can see from this video posted May 20.

Russia creates too many questions about Polish plane crash

The Russian government’s actions raise too many questions about the April 10 airplane crash that killed many of the most anti-Russian leaders of Poland. My recent conversations with informed Polish sources reveal so many irregularities with how the Russian government handled the crash that nobody should presume that the disaster was accidental until all the facts are in. I knew...

Our Wall Street Journal team won the Russia debate on NPR

A team consisting of a former Moscow correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, a current Wall Street Journal columnist and editorial board member and this blogger, J Michael Waller, won an Oxford-style debate in New York on National Public Radio. An audience of 300 people voted on the winner. The debate topic was, “Russia Is Becoming Our Enemy Again.” Arguing...

Canada cites Dr Waller in deportation of Russian ‘illegal’ spy

(Institute of World Politics news release) The Canadian Security and Intelligence Service (CSIS) extensively cited Dr Waller in support of its request for a Montreal court to hold an alleged Russian “illegal” spy. The alleged Russian deep-cover agent, who goes by the assumed name Paul William Hampel, is being held under a rarely-used “security certificate” so that he can be...

Waller stands in for National Intelligence Officer at academic conference on Putin

[Institute of World Politics news release] Introduced by the moderator as “the only panelist who can say, ‘I told you so,’” Professor J. Michael Waller took part in a panel discussion on Russian politics as part of the annual convention of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies (AAASS, pronounced “triple-A, double-S”). The question put forth before the November 18 panel was, “Is...

Introduction to dismantling a secret police state

Ilan Berman of the American Foreign Policy Council and J. Michael Waller edited a series of articles on the legacies of totalitarian secret police systems. Those articles were published in August, 2004, in Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization. Berman and Waller co-wrote the following introduction to the series: When a totalitarian group seizes power, whether by parliamentary maneuver or by...

Russia: Death and Resurrection of the KGB

Russia: Death and Resurrection of the KGB J Michael Waller Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization, Summer 2004      “We represent in ourselves organized terror–this must be said very clearly.” Feliks Dzerzhinsky, founder of Cheka   The roots of all of the most efficient political police systems in modern history can be traced to December 20, 1917. On that...

Espionage and national security

“Espionage and National Security” By J Michael Waller, Insight magazine, April 2, 2001 The latest spy scandal involving FBI agent Robert Hanssen reveals America’s weakened ability to defend against espionage and a woeful lack of will to do anything about it.  Coca-Cola has kept its formula a secret since the 1800s. Kentucky Fried Chicken has never let the competition get its hands on Col. Sanders’ original recipe. So why has the U.S. government lost its most sensitive secrets to foreign spies?  Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were executed for passing secrets concerning atomic weapons to Josef Stalin only months after Harland Sanders started franchising the chicken business from his service station and restaurant in Corbin, Ky. While the Kentucky colonel successfully guarded his recipe and production methods, the U.S. government continued to hemorrhage everything from the identities of its agents to ultrasecret cryptography, spy-satellite manuals and designs of nuclear weapons.  The Feb. 18 arrest of senior FBI agent Robert P. Hanssen on charges of espionage for Russia was just the latest in a series of scandals involving the federal government’s inability to protect the secrets of spycraft and research and development that keep the American people safe and free. While espionage and the human frailties that lead men to betray their country are facts of life, the U.S. government has been slow — some say criminally negligent — to take the necessary measures required to reduce foreign penetration of this country’s most sensitive institutions.  All countries of any consequence practice espionage — an activity older than Scripture — to advance their interests against their neighbors or to ensure their survival. That doesn’t mean the United States should not defend against it, security and intelligence experts say, especially when it strikes at national security.  And that is at the core of current debate. American political leaders are quick to wring their hands and make bold threats in the weeks following the arrest of an alleged traitor, but the fact is they have a long record of dropping the ball. Policy recommendations made to block security vulnerabilities after the so-called “Year of the Spy” in 1985 have yet to be implemented 16 years later.  When the FBI uncovered the KGB spy ring led by John Walker in 1985 (actually, family members turned him in), President Reagan retaliated against the Soviets in no uncertain terms. Reagan decapitated Moscow’s espionage presence in the United States by ordering the expulsion of 95 KGB officers who were working here under official cover in embassies, consulates, trade missions and other facilities across the United States. That simple action destroyed much of the KGB’s carefully built presence in the United States.  By contrast, when the FBI arrested CIA officer Aldrich Ames as a Russian spy in 1994, President Clinton did nothing. Later, a couple of Russian intelligence officers who had been handling Ames were sent packing — but quietly, so as not to embarrass the Kremlin.  Intelligence specialists tell Insight that now, with February’s arrest of senior FBI counterintelligence agent Hanssen as a spy for Vladimir Putin’s Russia, President Bush finds himself at a crossroads. He can emulate his hero, Ronald Reagan, or he can follow the Clinton route.  The Bush administration has described the Hanssen case as one of the most devastating acts of treason in U.S. history. FBI Director Louis J. Freeh calls Hanssen’s alleged espionage “the most traitorous actions imaginable” inflicting “exceptionally grave” damage on national security. Attorney General John Ashcroft says, “The arrest of Robert Hanssen for espionage should remind every American that our nation, our free society, is an international target in a dangerous world. In fact, the espionage operations designed to steal vital secrets of the United States are as intense today as they have ever been.”  But while the FBI builds a body of evidence that even the federal judge hearing the Hanssen case calls extraordinarily strong, intelligence experts note, the government of KGB veteran Putin appears to be getting away scot-free.  So what should the United States do? Freeh ordered a comprehensive review of FBI information- and personnel-security programs to detect cases of betrayal within the bureau and to help prevent such breaches from occurring. Judge William Webster, who has directed both the FBI and the CIA, is conducting the review.  But clearly, a review of FBI security procedures is just one small part of the solution, say national-security specialists. “The recovery from this must be a concerted bipartisan effort on [Capitol] Hill and done with the closest cooperation with the Bush administration even to begin to repair the damage” says John Wobensmith, a former senior National Security Agency official now with the Institute of World Politics in Washington.  Indeed, say Capitol Hill sources, matters of security, counterintelligence and intelligence are among the last areas where political partisanship tends to stop at the water’s edge, so the potential for advancing remedies is strong. A bipartisan approach to improving security and counterintelligence after the 1994 Ames arrest helped create the working relationship between the FBI and CIA that apparently allowed the CIA to play a key role in identifying Hanssen as an alleged Soviet penetration agent. According to information in the affidavit filed in federal court after Hanssen’s arrest, the CIA appears to have provided the FBI with intelligence from Moscow that pointed to Hanssen.  Hanssen’s attorney, Plato Cacheris, declined an Insight request for an interview. Cacheris has said that Hanssen will plead “not guilty — for now” He did not say that his client is innocent or that the charges against Hanssen are false. He appears to some to be trying to open the door for cooperation by Hanssen that will save the alleged traitor from execution. Cacheris also served as Ames’ defense counsel and as counsel to Monica Lewinsky.  If penetration of the U.S. government by foreign agents and influence is to be stopped, say experts, attitude matters. Even with a general bipartisan consensus, however, Congress has not shown a sustained interest in passing the necessary laws to stop foreign spying. Recent history shows that official Washington is too easily distracted and tends to lose interest once the headlines and public outrage have dissipated, notes Kenneth deGraffenreid, a senior National Security Council official under Reagan. In the early 1990s, the FBI slashed its counterintelligence forces to head off even deeper cuts that Congress was demanding.  Until the Ames arrest, the CIA was viewed as so arrogant that it scornfully dismissed those who suggested it was vulnerable to espionage. The academic and policy community dealing with security and intelligence was equally dismissive of such concerns. That attitude stifled creative thinking that could have pointed out vulnerabilities, say counterespionage experts.  A Boston University graduate student, basing his research entirely on articles in the open Soviet press concerning the discovery and execution of government and military officials accused of spying for the West, wrote a hypothesis in 1989 that the KGB had penetrated the office responsible for Soviet affairs within the CIA Directorate of Operations. When he presented the theory to his professor, a veteran of the intelligence world and a hard-liner concerning the Soviets, he was surprised at the response. “I agree with your theory” the professor said. “It is entirely plausible and maybe even probable. But if you write anything about it as a graduate student, all the `experts’ will laugh you out of a career.”  The student never wrote the paper and, discouraged, never went into government service. Five years later, Ames — who had worked in the very subunit the student had identified — was arrested. Security procedures had been so lax that Ames’ CIA colleagues failed to question his depression, alcohol abuse, unexplained wealth and other signs that often profile a betrayal.  After the unmasking of Ames, the CIA lost its smugness about its own security and began a rigorous personnel-security program, including more-systematic polygraphs, with the FBI’s help. But the FBI never instituted a similar security program of its own. And it never polygraphed its senior agents, including Hanssen.  Polygraphs, commonly called lie detectors, are not foolproof and are far from a cure-all. Manuals available on the Internet show how the guilty can trump the tests, while many innocent people, particularly those with strong religious convictions, perspire and demonstrate stress that, to the polygraph, makes them look guilty.  “If polygraphs were either really lie detectors — that is, they worked pretty much all the time and accurately — or they were merely random and worthless instruments, this would be an easy discussion” R. James Woolsey, a former CIA director, said at a recent Institute of World Politics forum on the Hanssen case. “The problem is that they are not” That’s where the person nel-security procedures, now under review, come in.  Damage from an espionage case such as Ames’ or Hanssen’s extends far more deeply than the secrets compromised by the acts of treason, according to those assigned official responsibility for evaluating such problems. Cases of trusted officials being accused of betrayal have “a very degrading and debilitating effect on the attitudes and morale of people on the inside seeing this persistent repetition of failure,” notes John Dziak, a retired senior Pentagon intelligence officer. “This effect multiplies the weakness inflicted by the actual espionage itself.”  Woolsey is urging a more-aggressive watch for foreign spies operating and running their agents on U.S. territory — particularly those attached to embassies and trade missions. U.S. counterintelligence sources tell Insight that there are more Russian intelligence officers based on U.S. territory now than during the Cold War.  A damage assessment, the FBI says, will take months; other experts say it will take years. And damage could continue for decades due to the compromise of highly sensitive and extremely expensive technologies and intelligence processes. “Of equal or perhaps even more serious long-term consequences is that our friends and allies may lose confidence in the U.S. ability to protect sensitive matters, and thus they will be very reluctant to share their sensitive information with us,” says Wobensmith. “It will take considerable amounts of money, new and innovative science and technology, and considerable diplomatic and liaison efforts overseas in order to recover”  Most important of all, as Woolsey, Freeh and others have noted, are attitude and long-range thinking. Regardless of public mood, government leaders and the national-security community must remain constantly on guard. Intelligence veterans like to quote John Philpot Curran’s famous 1790 speech upon the Right of Election: “The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance.” Yet, every time an espionage scandal fades from public view, official Washington crawls back into its comfy crib and convinces itself that spies as a national-security matter have been thrown on the ash heap of the Cold War. It is no secret that some U.S. officials even persuaded themselves that Soviet espionage against the United States actually was good for national security.  That attitude may have helped the country’s potential adversaries in another way. Apart from HUMINT (or human intelligence) against the United States, there is the question of SIGINT (or signals intelligence — electronic intelligence-gathering by intercepting telecommunications and other means). In the mid-1990s, post-Soviet Russia upgraded its huge Soviet-built SIGINT facility in Lourdes, Cuba. The sprawling, 26-square-mile facility was designed to intercept government and private communications across the entire southeastern United States, including Washington. The Clinton/ Gore administration repeatedly resisted Senate attempts to apply relatively minor sanctions on Moscow for its continued use and new upgrades of the Lourdes site.  A majority of the Senate objected to pouring taxpayer dollars into Russia as long as Moscow was paying the Castro regime an estimated $200 million a year to rent the land for the Lourdes SIGINT base. So the Senate passed legislation that would cut U.S. aid to Russia by an equal amount.  In May 1995 — after the Ames arrest — Undersecretary of State Peter Tarnoff appeared before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and opposed this docking of aid to Russia because of Moscow’s subsidy for Lourdes. Tarnoff added that although “we are not pleased” by Russia’s electronic spying from Cuba, the Lourdes outpost served U.S. national interests because it helped Russia verify that Washington was not cheating on arms-control treaties.  Two years later, in a break with administration policy, Defense Secretary William Cohen told Congress he was “concerned about the use of Cuba as a base for intelligence activities directed at the United States.” But he made no policy recommendations and did not identify Russia by name.  In the meantime, the Russians upgraded the site. And more recently, Communist China has built one — possibly two — electronic spy posts on the island, with no objections from Washington.  Espionage will never stop. But its damage to U.S. national security can be limited. Only with strong diplomatic and other actions, Reagan veterans tell Insight, can the intelligence offensive be blunted. That means the diplomatic headache of naming names and retaliating — first by following the example set by Reagan in 1985 and second by hitting the perpetrating power where it hurts most: in the wallet. Russia is desperately seeking Western relief from its crippling debt payments. Reagan veterans say that Russia’s debt is its Achilles’ heel — and that the United States ought to cut it in the wake of the recent revelations at the FBI.

Portrait of Putin’s past

Portrait of Putin’s Past Perspective, Vol. X, No. 3, January-February 2000 By J. MICHAEL WALLER American Foreign Policy Council Why is so little known about the KGB career of Russia’s acting President Vladimir Putin? Most reporting on both sides of the Atlantic is thinly sourced, if sourced at all, and often conflicting. Was Putin a professional foreign intelligence cadre officer...

The narcostate next door

The Narcostate Next Door by J Michael Waller, Insight, December 27, 1999 A former head of the secret police is the Mexican ruling party’s new presidential candidate. His challenger is a free marketeer who wants to end 70 years of kleptocracy.  It’s a sure sign that a corrupt regime is on its last legs when the head of the secret police becomes the anointed presidential candidate of the ruling party. This specter not only is appearing in far-off Russia, where the icy KGB veteran Vladimir Putin runs the government day to day and plans to succeed ailing President Boris Yeltsin. It also is right on the U.S. border.  Seventy years of rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, has plunged Mexico into a state of lawlessness from intense street crime to multibillion-dollar payoffs of politicians, judges and police by drug kingpins. Francisco Labastida, the 57-year-old PRI presidential candidate for the July 2000 elections, is portraying himself as the tough guy who will clamp down on unprecedented criminality that has been tearing Mexican society apart.  But the PRI faces its strongest opposition ever. It has lost control of the federal Congress to a coalition of the large conservative and leftist opposition. The main opposition leader, Guanajuato governor Vicente Fox, is a charismatic free-market politician with a positive message and a growing, pro-U.S. National Action Party, the PAN. And Labastida is dogged by allegations — yet unproved — that he cut deals with drug traffickers while governor of Sinaloa, a Pacific-coast state, a decade ago.  Labastida’s presidential candidacy is unique in that he assumed the PRI’s mantle not by the traditional dedazo, the fingering by the incumbent PRI president, but in a competitive party primary. His come-from-behind win in the Nov. 7 primary was organized by former secret-police chief Fernando Gutierrez Barrios with some help from U.S. pollster Stan Greenberg and President Clinton’s political hatchet man James Carville. And the man who would be Mexico’s next president has plenty of other tricks up his sleeve. From January 1998 to last May he was the second-most-powerful man in Mexico as secretary of government, the chief political enforcer of the PRI who headed the party’s secret political police network and held a massive array of levers to keep the corrupt party in power. Mexico’s current president, Ernesto Zedillo, tapped Labastida to deal with the Marxist insurgency in Chiapas and to mobilize the PRI machinery and resources of the state against the opposition Congress.  On Labastida’s watch, opposition politicians discovered a nationwide electronic eavesdropping system used to spy on political opponents, journalists, businessmen and others. Even Rep. Santiago Creel of the center-right PAN party found his offices had been wired. Creel had been investigating corrupt PRI governors and headed a congressional committee to find ways to put them on trial. At one electronic spy center in Campeche, investigators found seven years’ worth of tapes and transcripts documenting the private lives of opposition figures and others. When the left-wing PRD party won control of the Mexico City government in the last mayoral election, the secret police packed the offices with hidden cameras and microphones.  As PAN’s presidential candidate, Fox says, he assumes the government is spying on his every conversation as well. Fox found proof in March 1998, during Labastida’s secret-police tenure, that the government was tapping his telephones. Now that he is Labastida’s leading challenger for the June 2000 election, say regional specialists, it is likely that every imaginable spying and covert disinformation scheme is being mounted against Fox.  As a longtime insider near the epicenter of the party’s system of payoffs and patronage, Labastida is nothing if not a dangerous opponent in a country teetering on anarchy. During the 1970s he was subdirector of President Luis Echeverria’s euphemistically titled Public Investments office and chief of fiscal promotion for the finance secretariat under President Jose Lopez Portillo. He served as undersecretary of budgeting and planning from 1979 to 1982 when Lopez Portillo nationalized the banks and went on to become secretary of energy, mines and para-state industry at the dawn of the country’s fantastically corrupt privatization process.  Few politicians, if any, can rise in the PRI and not be tainted by corruption. But Mexican and U.S. observers are deeply concerned about those alleged Labastida ties to drug traffickers since his term as governor of Sinaloa from 1987 through 1992. Home to the resort city of Mazatlan, Sinaloa became an important transshipment point for cocaine and other illegal drugs from South America to distribution networks in the United States. A new PAN report obtained by Insight says that the party’s gubernatorial candidate in Sinaloa, Emilio Goicochea Luna, claimed that the narcotraffickers’ power in the state was so strong that “Labastida had to negotiate with them to be able to govern.”  That’s an understatement compared with reports in Mexico’s respected El Financiero newspaper, generally regarded as pro-PRI, which reported in 1995, “It was the politicians who brought in the narco invasion, not the reverse.” The article alleged that in 1982 senior Mexican officials plotted to manage and control the cultivation and distribution of drugs, mostly in northern states including Sinaloa, and to build a network of clandestine airstrips in Sinaloa and elsewhere for cocaine and heroin flights from South America.  Sinaloa police were out of control. During Labastida’s six years in office 26 major prison breaks occurred in Sinaloa in which 362 criminals escaped. In April 1989, when he was on a scuba-diving trip with his friend, billionaire PRI functionary and reputed drug kingpin Carlos Hank Gonzalez, federal troops swooped into Culiacan, the state capital, in a surprise raid and arrested his police chiefs on drug-trafficking charges. The army reportedly detained the entire Culiacan police force as well as the local juridical police chief, who stood accused of offering protection to major drug operations. Labastida did crack down on certain drug capos in Sinaloa and was sent abroad as ambassador to Portugal reportedly after receiving death threats.  The CIA certainly believes that Labastida collaborated with the drug traffickers. When Labastida became secretary of government in early 1998, Washington Times national-security correspondent Bill Gertz revealed a top-secret CIA report which stated, “Labastida’s appointment could prove costly to the Zedillo administration should reports become public that he has maintained ties to narcotraffickers since his time as governor of Sinaloa.”  The CIA document stated, “Labastida has denied receiving payoffs but has acknowledged privately that he had to reach unspecified agreements with traffickers and turn a blind eye to some of their activities.” U.S. government sources tell Insight that security agencies have no concrete proof to substantiate the denied allegations and press reports are short on specifics. However, the allegations continue to dog the candidate.  Labastida is much more of a populist than the often-colorless technocrats who have ruled Mexico during the last 18 years. His stump speeches call for “recovering” Mexico’s lost middle class and increasing the social focus of economic programs, calling for more government spending on social programs. “One cannot ask a market economy what it cannot provide” he says. “A strong state that satisfies the social demands is required.”  But Mexico under the PRI still lacks a market economy, according to a new Wall Street Journal/Heritage Foundation global economic study, which ranks Mexico “mostly not free” and among the worst places to do business in Latin America. One of the problems is government corruption and the palsied hand of the law. The free-market PAN party “fully agrees with these findings,” calling them “the result of a political economy whose objective is the perpetuation of a `crony capitalism’ that benefits the constituent parts of the ruling PRI.”  Labastida opposes privatization of the state-controlled PEMEX oil monopoly or of other oil resources, and he won’t say whether he would privatize electrical utilities. “He witnessed, and sometimes participated in, most of the major events that have shaped the modern economic history of Mexico” according to a PAN report. “He witnessed the first major devaluation with Echeverria, the nationalization of the Mexican banks by Lopez Portillo, the design and implementation of the first ‘Pactos’ [to open up the economy] with De la Madrid and the ‘mother of all Mexican crises’ with Zedillo.” Says the PAN review, “In all cases, he loyally stayed with the system.”